UNDATED (WJON News) -- September's weather turned out to be very pleasant in central Minnesota with temperatures most days generally above normal.

So what can we expect in the month of October?

Climate Prediction Center
Climate Prediction Center
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The Climate Prediction Center says our trend of above-normal temperatures will continue into October for the whole state, and for much of the country for that matter.

Specifically here in St. Cloud, our average high temperature at the beginning of the month is 64 degrees and our average low temperature is 43 degrees.

The latest forecast says our high temperatures should be at or above normal at least into the middle of next week.  Overnight lows should also stay above normal at least into the middle of next week.

By the time we get to Halloween, the normal high here in St. Cloud is about 49 degrees and the normal low is around 30 degrees.

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The Climate Prediction Center says most of Minnesota should be pretty close to normal for precipitation in October.  However, the southwestern part of the state is trending to be below normal.

Climate Prediction Center
Climate Prediction Center
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Here in St. Cloud, we normally get about 2 1/2 inches of rain in the month of October.  We also average about 1 inch of snow in October.  (However, you might recall last October when we had 7.8 inches of snow.)

So far this fall, we are lagging behind in moisture.  The National Weather Service says we've had 2.19 inches of rain in St. Cloud, which is .74 inches below normal.

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