For two of the Owatonna High School runners qualifying for the state cross country meet, this is their first appearance. For the other two, it's the third time qualifying, but just the second time they get to run at state. Sophomores Anna Cox and Carsyn Brady and seniors Preston Meier and Connor Ginskey (left to right in the photo) compete on Saturday, November 6 at St. Olaf College in Northfield.

HEAR INTERVIEWS WITH THE RUNNERS BELOW!

Meier is grateful for the chance to run, "(Last year) There was no state meet, which was very disappointing. But I'm thankful that this year being a senior that I get to run it. Because I feel bad for the seniors last year who qualified but didn't get to finish off at the state meet."

OHS senior Preston Meier

Ginskey is proud to represent OHS at state, but was mostly focused on the team during the section meet, "I wasn't really thinking about individual qualification coming into it. We really, really wanted to qualify as a team."  The Huskies finished a close third behind Lakeville South in the final team standings. Ginskey had a personal-best run at sections.

OHS senior Connor Ginskey

Brady is ready to go, "I'm really excited to run again." After starting off a bit too quickly two years ago, she "knows what to expect." Brady also says she likes the fact the finish line at state is an uphill stretch.

OHS sophomore Carsyn Brady

Cox prefers running downhill, herself, and is quite thrilled to qualify for state, "I'm so excited. I'm so honored to represent Owatonna at the state meet." Cox finished as the sixth, and final, individual runner to advance to state and got a little emotional when she realized she'd made it.

OHS sophomore Anna Cox

The AAA boys run at 9:30 am Saturday, November 6. The girls compete at 10:30 am. A medal ceremony follows each race.

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