Minnesota has never had a Mega Millions jackpot winner. Ever. Until yesterday! One lucky Minnesotan won the Mega Millions jackpot just yesterday.

I couldn't believe it when I saw that they're the first Minnesotan ever to win the jackpot. Obviously, there are small odds of winning the jackpot but man, I didn't think we've never had one ever before. Then again, we haven't been involved in Mega Millions for that long.

Portrait of a very happy young man in a rain of money
Credit: Gettystock/Thinkstock
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Apparently, Minnesota joined Mega Millions just in 2010, according to KARE 11. Only 12 years ago, so that's not a terribly long time for someone here to win the big one. But someone had to do it eventually. As far as I know, we still don't know who the winner is. However, we do know that the winning ticket was sold at the Holiday Station Store at 14350 Xkimo St. in Ramsey.

Pile of Money
Credit: ThinkStock
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The winning jackpot was a whopping $106 million. Of course, the big thing everyone likes to talk about with the lottery is how much money is the winner ACTUALLY going to get? Well, according to KARE 11, if the winner takes the cash they'll get $67.3 million. Not too shabby.

Sadly, we don't have millions that we can give you, but we do have a chance for you to win $2,000 every weekday and a grand prize of $10,000! That's pretty good! You can get more details by tapping 'Win $10,000 Cash' on the app.

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Fun fact, the largest Mega Million jackpot ever won was $1.537 billion, with a 'b'. That's nuts! Keep scrolling to check out your odds of winning the lottery and other crazy odds.

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